Pam Marron Home Lending

HUD Housing Counselors Continue Assisting Negative Equity Homeowners

July 28, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Housing counselors continue to assist negative equity homeowners who need help staying put in homes while working on initiative to assist those having trouble reentering the housing market because of foreclosure code wrongly applied to past mortgage credit

HUD approved housing counselors can still assist homeowners struggling to stay put in negative equity homes. But a new effort will check credit of those who have had a past short sale, modification, deed in lieu or excessive mortgage late’s where foreclosure code is applied and causes a mortgage denial for past homeowners eligible for a new mortgage.

Current funding still exists to help homeowners with negative equity who are struggling to stay in their home, but not for long. National Foreclosure Mitigation Counseling funding will expire on September 30, 2017 so here’s a shout out to loan originators and realtors: Refer clients that you know are in need to HUD approved housing counselors that can be located in each state at HUD.gov.

As we turn the corner from the housing recession, problems continue to linger. In 2011, it was found that short sale credit was often coded as a foreclosure and is easily spotted where mortgage delinquency over 120 days occurs. In 2013, Senator Bill Nelson of Florida demanded that this problem be corrected and a workaround was done in the Fannie Mae automated system. But there was never a workaround done in the Freddie Mac system and due to the popularity of the Freddie Mac Home Possible program, past short-sellers with the foreclosure code issue are now being denied through the Freddie Mac Loan Product Advisor automated system. Further, all were stunned when an initiative started by the housing counseling industry for affected past short-sellers resulted in finding that the foreclosure code was also being applied to those with a modification and often a deed in lieu.

The root cause of this problem is not the Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac automated underwriting systems. Recently, a past homeowner who did not have a short sale, modification or deed in lieu but did have excessive mortgage late’s before she sold her home applied for a car loan at a credit union. She was denied the loan because her past mortgage credit showed up as a foreclosure and the loan was never run through the Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac automated systems.

The root of this problem appears to be that foreclosure code is applied to a mortgage when delinquency over 120 days occurs. The verbiage “settled for less than full balance” or that a loan is classified as a modification or deed in lieu does not appear to be superior to a payment history that is 120 days or more delinquent.

There is no specific credit code for a short sale or modification and there needs to be. And we need specific clarification to use credit code “89” for a completed deed in lieu. We need this now so that past homeowners who did the right thing and worked with their lender or a housing counselor to stay in their homes for as long as they could do not have their credit wrongly coded, causing future turmoil when they try to purchase a home again. We haven’t even scratched what this problem is doing to their other consumer credit.

Credit…. Having good credit…. Is what every American is taught about at an early age and what they strive for. Credit is what makes the economy run and better credit leads to better reward. It is frustrating that we are still dealing with a problem that the masses have known about for years, but that is adversely affecting the credit for millions and stalling many from reentering the housing market.

Last week, the offices of two Senators and three Congressman who get this problem were visited. The problem and a way that the housing counseling industry can help were shown to mortgage industry stakeholders at the HOPE NOW Fly-In. Presently, the housing counseling industry is fine tuning a process that will provide affected consumers with a correction to this problem…. before they purchase a home again. Our hope is to promote this service to loan originators and realtors and to have them refer potentially affected consumers to housing counselors who will take care of this problem before consumers purchase again. All of this is being done while we work on a bi-partisan effort with legislators to get a specific credit code for both short sales and modifications.

Stay tuned.

Housing Counselors Hone Skills for Service That Will Assist Those with Past Short Sale, Deed-in-Lieu or Modification Where Credit Shows Up as Foreclosure

July 8, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

By Pam Marron | National Mortgage Professional Magazine |July 2017

Step One… Loan Originators and Realtors need to ask ALL clients if they’ve had a short sale, Deed in Lieu (DIL) or loan modification in their past. If they have, run the loan through Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac automated systems first to see if foreclosure credit, a “dispute” or incorrect “Date Reported” exists.

Step Two… spread the word that HUD approved housing counselors can assist these clients to correct (not temporarily hide) erroneous credit to get affected consumers “mortgage-ready” ahead of signing a contract.

 Many of nearly 3 million consumers with a past short sale, over 5 million who have had a loan modification and an unknown number with a past DIL need urgent attention to correct a credit error known about since 2011. Affected past homeowners are now eligible to purchase a home again but are being denied new Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac conventional financing where their credit for a short sale, deed-in-lieu or modification shows up as a foreclosure and results in a new loan denial.

The initial problem is when short sale, DIL and modification credit shows up as a foreclosure, often anticipated if past late mortgage payments went over 120 days.

When the affected consumer is told their credit wrongly shows up as a foreclosure, a “dispute” is placed on the account which simply hides the credit from the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac automated systems… and then must be deleted when the client applies for a new mortgage. (A new change to the Fannie Mae “dispute” policy will take effect on July 29, 2017.)

And, because the account was re-investigated after the short sale, DIL or modification closing date, the “Date Reported” becomes more current, causing the automated system to provide a denial because it appears that the required wait timeframe has not been met.

Loan originators often proceed with processing a new mortgage after checking the required wait timeframe against the closing date of the past short sale, DIL or modification. But sometime during the process or even as late as underwriting, the loan is run through either Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac automated systems where the problem is first seen. Many lenders are unaware of the Fannie Mae workaround (there is no workaround for Freddie Mac!) and often tell blind-sided consumers to “go get your credit fixed and come back.” With the limited supply of housing inventory, sellers are reluctant to extend closing dates for additional time needed to investigate the credit error. Many homebuyers either lose the contract due to the delay to get this fixed or change their loan type to a higher interest rate portfolio loan or an FHA loan.

It makes sense to engage the housing counseling industry into a pre-purchase solution. Loan originators are driven by contract deadlines. Non-profit housing counseling agencies work with clients on the “heavy lifting” to get issues corrected. And HUD approved housing counselors were able to verify “Economic Events” for extenuating circumstances for the past FHA “Back to Work” program.

Leading this initiative is the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (NFCC.org), a non-profit organization with HUD approved housing counselors and credit counseling services. The organization is training and testing solutions to address known fixes, with an emphasis on assisting affected consumers before they even sign a contract. The goal is to alert the real estate and mortgage industries of this service to get potential affected clients “mortgage ready” before sending them back to the real estate and mortgage professionals.

Providing this individualized service to those with a past short sale, DIL or modification who want to purchase a home again is a tremendous relief to these consumers who don’t want to relive their past nightmare again.

This pre-purchase assistance needs to be promoted to affected consumers, the mortgage and real estate industries, loan processors and credit reporting agencies. Correcting issues can be as quickly as 1 day to 60 days.

This will be an up-front fee paid service from an individual housing counselor. Loan originators who wish to assist these clients can refer them to HUD approved housing counselors who have been trained on how to get these unique credit issues corrected once and for all. Then, when the client is deemed “mortgage ready”, they can come back to the loan originator who can provide a credit back towards mortgage closing costs when these folks are ready for a new mortgage.

Everyone benefits. Stay tuned.

Join FAMP’s Gulf Coast Chapter June 20 for Lunch and Learn

June 20, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Lunch and Learn slider June 2017

This class is geared for all mortgage professionals who have had an issue with correcting the credit report.

Pam Marron, Loan Originator, and Theresa McCoy, CIC Credit Reporting Agency, to show how correct inaccurate foreclosure credit in short sale and loan modifications for the Gulf Coast Chapter of the Florida Association of Mortgage Professionals in this Lunch and Learn program at Chili’s, 2903 N. Dale Mabry in Tampa on June 20 from 11:30-1pm.

Register at http://planetreg.com/junelunchandlearn

Download the Case Studies from Pam Marron’s presentation (Parts 1 & 2) by clicking below:

7.-10-case-studies-4-17-17-Part-1

7.-10-case-studies-4-17-17-Part-2

These are 10 Case files where foreclosure credit code showed up on past short sales, modifications or neither. Analyzing credit and differences between what is seen on Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac automated systems.

Pre-purchase help coming from HUD approved housing counselors to assist clients who still have credit issues with a past short sale or modification

May 4, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

By Pamela Marron | National Mortgage Professional Magazine | May 2017

HUD approved housing counselors are being trained to provide assistance for clients who continue to have problems with short sale and modification credit that appears as a foreclosure. The goal is to correct problems prior to a new purchase.

A collaborative initiative has begun that connects loan originators who have clients with a past short sale or a modification with HUD approved housing counselors who can make sure that common credit issues are resolved before clients sign a home purchase agreement. The goal is to provide correction to a continued problem of foreclosure credit code that incorrectly shows up on short sale and modification credit and often results in a loan denial and loss of contract. Worse yet, a foreclosure coding delays a new conventional mortgage for seven years rather than the four year wait required after a short sale. And recently, it has been found that modification credit is being affected with the same foreclosure code.

Over 1 million past short-sellers are now beyond the four year time frame and are eligible to purchase a home again. Another 950,000 will become eligible over the next three years. For those with modifications, no wait timeframe is required and over 1 million have been put in place from March 2009 to March 2017.

Correcting continued credit issues ahead of signing a contract for eligible past short-sellers is the focus of a small group of loan originators and housing counselors who are preparing this initiative. “Too many times, past short-sellers are told within the processing time and during a live contract that their short sale shows up as a foreclosure, and that they need to go get it fixed and come back.” states loan originator Pam Marron. “A service is needed for affected clients to get this credit issue permanently resolved ahead of time so that these clients are mortgage – ready.”

Fannie Mae developed a workaround in August 2014 but not all lenders know about it. There is no workaround in Freddie Mac. And though both Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac note there may be exceptions when inaccurate credit exists, lenders are reluctant to address this.

Marron cites that additional credit issues commonly grow out of the inaccurate foreclosure code for most of these clients when they either attempt to remedy the problem themselves or go to credit repair companies. A “dispute”, the most common fix, temporarily masks the short sale credit and appears to work when credit scores go up. However, when the consumer applies for a mortgage, either the underwriter, Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac automated system findings require that the dispute be taken off. The result is that credit scores plummet, a conventional mortgage denial is received and a delay to fix often occurs and can be a serious problem if a contract deadline is looming. If the consumer is in a contract, the quickest remedy is a Rapid Rescore that must be paid for by the lender. Often, the resulting credit scores are lower and the consequence is a higher interest rate.

A second problem is a more recent “date reported” when the short sale credit is reopened in order to get it corrected. The more recent date reported often falls within the four year wait timeframe causing the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac automated systems to issue a denial due to the wait timeframe not being met.

Marron thinks this service coming from third party HUD approved housing counselors is a perfect fit. “Loan originators are driven by contract deadlines. Housing counselors are not.”

Solutions for correcting the credit issues discussed are already available but assisting those who have had a past short sale or modification is the best way to find more ways for correction. Ms. Marron and Jim McMahan, a loan originator in Georgia, will begin taking calls for consumers with a past short sale or a modification this month. The National Foundation for Credit Counseling (NFCC.org) will start this effort and utilize HUD approved housing counselors to work with affected consumers to ensure the credit issues of a past short sale will not hamper their ability to get a new conventional mortgage.

There will be a fee for the one on one counseling and a credit towards closing costs on a home purchase can be provided. Contact Pam Marron at 727-375-8986 or email pam.m.marron@gmail.com or Jim McMahan at 404-808-0945 or email jim@mcmahanmortgage.com.

Stay tuned.

When Unpopular Policy Works

December 6, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Our current administration inherited a financial crisis that this country has not experienced anything close to since the Great Depression. When the collapse occurred, it was visible by the number of unoccupied homes, and many of us knew of friends, relatives and colleagues who were affected. Initially, problems were blamed on the unscrupulous mortgage broker industry until it was learned that the banking industry had an equal amount of blame.

Almost every loan originator I know was negatively impacted by the housing crisis. They were either losing their homes or their income and in many cases, both. All of us saw the housing bubble, but complacency set in after it continued for years, not months. When the crash happened, it was fast and mammoth. It had to be dealt with and the depth of problems that housing faced during the last eight years was unprecedented. Drastic measures were necessary to be put in place immediately to stop the bleeding.

Many say that measures put in place went too far and stalled the progress of the housing market and ultimately added more cost to the entire mortgage process. Others say it could have been much worse if these safeguards were not in place, and that the inconveniences placed upon our industry need to be adapted to. But a few changes occurred that have provided end results that could be argued as good.

The Role of AMC’s and Home Prices

Many of us have concerns when we see housing prices increase quicker than normal trends again. How do we safeguard against alarmingly fast increases in home value that was the norm prior to the crash? The answer appears to be the Appraisal Management Companies, or AMC’s where all (or at least) Qualified Mortgage (QM) appraisals must go through. Appraisals are now done by third-party appraisal management companies (AMC) who lenders and realtors have no communication with until after the appraisal is completed. Even though the process can be frustrating, the value can’t be blamed on the buyers’ lender. A dispute in value can be done but it is with the appraiser through the AMC rather than the lender.

Qualified Mortgages (QM)

Due to requirements put in place by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), almost all secondary market sellable mortgage products no longer have prepayment penalties, negative amortization, balloons and interest only options. Prior to the housing crash, these negative options were mostly explained to consumers as “rare to happen”, but ultimately became a main reason so many homeowners were negatively affected by the housing crash.

Consequently, a new industry of non-QM mortgage products is out there. Though a rare few have limited “skin in the game”, most of these products require 20% equity to do the deal.

I know that many in my industry have opposite views of the above. And, yes, policies can be streamlined. Frustrating to all of us is that dealing with housing issues seem to come to a standstill 6 to 12 months before every election cycle, seeming to be a topic that no political candidate wants to touch.

Please don’t say the past housing crash won’t happen again with policy changes in the new administration. Instead, those of us in the mortgage and real estate industries need to ensure that this doesn’t happen again by looking at what policies have and have not worked. More effort needs to be placed in finetuning policy that does work.

The Problem with Credit Report Disputes

October 3, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

By Pam Marron

Written for National Mortgage Professional Magazine, September 26, 2016

Many past short-sellers attempting to purchase a home are told that their short sale credit shows up as a foreclosure in the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac automated underwriting systems. Many of these affected consumers then dispute this credit or employ a credit repair company to do so. Thus, it is not uncommon to see a credit dispute on past short sale credit.

The problem with credit disputes is that they are often a temporary fix. When a credit account is disputed, the creditor is given a 30-day timeframe to respond to the dispute. If the creditor does not respond, the disputed information is taken off the credit. However, the comment “account in dispute” appears on that credit line. Dispute comments make the affected account invisible to both Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac automated underwriting systems (AUS) causing the findings to be inaccurate. This is why underwriters require that dispute comments must be deleted from the credit report before an accurate response can be provided through the Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac automated underwriting systems.

When the dispute is lifted, the past negative credit appears again.

Your borrower can request that the dispute is deleted from their account themselves but the timeframe to get this done start to finish can take up to 50 days. Often, there is a signed purchase contract that is time sensitive. Instead of having the luxury of time, a costly Rapid Rescore must be done to get the dispute comments deleted quickly. And loan originators, YOU must pay for this Rapid Rescore.

It gets worse. On a Rapid Rescore, deleting dispute comments from a negative credit account usually results in a lower credit score.

If There is Time for Borrower to Handle Deleting Dispute Comments Directly with Creditor and Credit Bureaus

  1. Loan Originators: Check every credit report for dispute comments prior to application. If dispute comments exist, start working to delete these remarks immediately and allow for a closing date that gives enough time.
  2. Make sure your borrower has the name and account number of the disputed account creditor. Have the borrower contact the creditor directly to request deletion of dispute remarks. Depending on the dispute comments, deletion can take 24 hours to 30 days.
  3. Make sure that your borrower states and puts in writing if necessary that no other parties can provide a new dispute notice.
  4. Have your borrower contact the creditor 5 days later to insure the dispute has been taken off and have them retrieve a letter with contact information for verification purposes.
    • This letter can be used to send to the credit bureau to order a *Rapid Rescore, where corrected information is merged into a new credit report at a cost and produced within 2-5 days. The timeframe of getting this correction on a new credit report without using Rapid Rescore is 30-45 days after the creditor initiates the deletion.
  5. Once the creditor has confirmed that the dispute comments have been removed, have your borrower contact the live agent at the Dispute Department for each of the 3 credit bureaus and ask them to remove the dispute comments. Ask each credit bureau if a request to delete a dispute must be requested in writing or if this can be done over the phone. (This can vary depending on the status of the dispute.) If a letter is needed, the borrower will have retrieved this from the creditor.
    • TransUnion: 800-916-8800
    • Experian: 800-493-1058
    • Equifax: 877-322-8228
  6. Pull a new credit report 35 days after the borrower has requested that the dispute comments be deleted by the creditor. If dispute comments still show up, wait another 10 days and repull credit.
  7. When the new credit report with deleted dispute comment comes in, check the credit score, make sure the loan still fits within program guidelines and run through Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac automated underwriting system.

Retrieving the Credit Report with a 2-5 Day *Rapid Rescore Through a Credit Reporting Agency

A new credit report can commonly be updated in 2-5 business days using *Rapid Rescore. You, the loan originator will have to pay for this.

  1. Each credit reporting agency (CRA) has a link to 1) TransUnion, 2) Equifax and 3) Experian for each account on the credit report that allows you to see “which bureau” specifically has the dispute comment noted.
  2. Complete the generic form for your CRA to order the deletion of dispute remarks for only those bureaus that show the dispute through a *Rapid Rescore for each borrower connected to the dispute account and who is on the new mortgage.
  3. When the new credit report is done, follow step 7 above.

Loan Delinquency Rate Up, Potential Home Sales Improve

August 23, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

by Phil Hall, August 22, 2016 as published on National Mortgage Professional Magazine

The week is getting off to a bit of a decent start, at least in terms of the latest housing market data.

Black Knight Financial Services’ “first look” at July’s mortgage environment has determined that the U.S. home loan delinquency rate rose 4.78 percent from June, although it is down 3.38 percent from July 2015. There were more solid numbers regarding foreclosure starts—61,300 in July, down 11.54 percent from June and down 14.27 percent from a year ago—and on the total pre-sale foreclosure inventory—1.09 percent, down 1.68 percent from the previous month and down a significant 28.36 percent from one year earlier.

However, the number of properties that are 30 or more days past due but not in foreclosure reached nearly 2.3 million, up 108,000 from June but down 70,000 from July 2015.

Separately, First American Financial Corp.’s proprietary Potential Home Sales model determined that the market for existing-home sales underperformed its potential in July by 1.3 percent or an estimated 92,000 seasonally adjusted, annualized rate (SAAR) of sales. This an improvement over June’s revised under-performance gap of 1.8 percent, or 104,000 (SAAR) sales. First American also reported that the market potential for existing-home sales grew last month by 0.15 percent compared to June, an increase of 8,000 (SAAR) sales, and increased by 5.4 percent compared to a year ago.

However, Mark Fleming, chief economist at First American, noted that a thorny problem that has bedeviled the housing recovery is showing no signs of abating.

“Low inventories still remain an issue, dropping to a 4.6-month supply, down from the 4.7-month supply seen in April and May, and from the 4.9-month supply of June 2015,” he said. “The constrained supply in this sellers’ market continues to frustrate potential homebuyers and adds further upward pressure to nominal home prices, which rose an estimated five percent year-over-year in May, according to the Case-Shiller House Price Index.”

Erroneous Foreclosure Code Still Results in Loan Denial for Past Short Sellers in Freddie Mac Loan Prospector(LP) for Conventional Loans

August 8, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Loan originator is asking your assistance to share LP conventional mortgage “Caution” files of past short sellers that have passed the 4-year mark.

by Pam Marron, July 28, 2016

In August of 2014, Fannie Mae successfully implemented an automated system workaround that enabled lenders to correct conventional loan Refer/Ineligible findings when past short sale credit shows up as a foreclosure in the Desktop Underwriter or Originator. Freddie Mac’s Loan Prospector automated underwriting system never implemented a correction, and past short sale credit still results in a Loan Prospector “Caution”, or loan denial, for those trying to obtain a new conventional mortgage after a shortsale. The problem does not occur for government FHA and VA loans. Freddie Mac’s Caution findings commonly lists in the reasons for denial under Credit Risk Comments: “13. Recent foreclosure/signif derog appears on credit report”.

A Freddie Mac “Caution” denial requires a manual underwrite to overcome this error.  Lenders that will do a manual underwrite on either Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae conventional loan files are rare to find. The good news is that the credit repository(s) reporting the foreclosure is now able to be found and seen in raw data through credit reporting agencies.

This would not be of such great concern if the mortgage industry was not approaching the rollout of the new “Trended Credit Data” that will work with the Fannie Desktop automated system in Version 10.0 set to be implemented on September 24, 2016.

If there are any glitches in the DU 10.0 format, lenders will likely put their loans through the Freddie Mac Loan Prospector automated underwriting system. Because a work around was never implemented for Freddie Mac, past short sellers eligible for a new mortgage will receive an automated “Caution”, or a denial for a new mortgage.

When the problem of the “Caution” in Freddie Mac’s automated system is brought up, the response from Freddie Mac has been that their system has been corrected and problems are with individual files. This article was written to alert Freddie Mac that as more past short sellers become eligible to purchase a home again, we as lenders are experiencing the problem of the “Caution” denial of new conventional mortgages on all files that are conventional, and more often.

This is what we are finding. All files currently being entered into Loan Prospector for a conventional mortgage purchase where a past short sale exists in credit are receiving a “Caution”, even when the past short sale is past the four-year mark, the wait time required after a short sale for a new Freddie Mac conventional mortgage.

A few lenders have stated they have received an “Accept” for a past short seller on a conventional mortgage, but we have found that only loans submitted for an FHA or VA loan appear to receive an “Accept”. This is believed to be due to the fact that Total Scorecard, an additional credit mechanism found in both Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, allows the loan to receive an Approve or Accept respectively through both systems but verification of the short sale account must be backed up with documentation proving a short sale rather than a foreclosure.

Additionally, it was checked to see if the problem was due to specific credit reporting agencies. Thus far, multiple credit agency reports for the same borrower have resulted in the same denial.

Unfortunately, Freddie Mac Loan Prospector does not designate which account it is classified as a foreclosure. However, the repository(s) that reports the short sale as a foreclosure can be visually found in raw data of the three repositories, Experian, Trans Union and Equifax in the credit report. Lenders who want to specifically see this to distinguish the problem need to make sure they contact their credit reporting agency and ask for the MOP (method of payment) and a horizontal payment history grid to be available on their report. A screen shot of raw data may ultimately be needed if where the foreclosure code exists is not evident on the visual credit report.

Because of the concern that mortgage traffic will increase in Freddie Mac Loan Prospector if a problem arises in Version 10.0 of the Fannie Mae Desktop Underwriter with the introduction of Trended Data Credit, we are proactively and respectfully bringing this known problem of short sale credit that shows up as a foreclosure on conventional loans only again to Freddie Mac’s attention. If you are a loan originator or lender that encounters a “Caution” denial in the Freddie Mac Loan Prospector automated underwriting system for past short sellers trying to obtain a conventional mortgage, please contact Pam Marron at 727-375-8986 or email pam.m.marron@gmail.com.

To best prepare, make sure that you run past short seller files through both Fannie Mae Desktop Underwriter/Originator and Freddie Mac’s Loan Prospector automated underwriting systems upfront. Don’t wait until the final submission to underwriting.

Stay tuned.

Post-Foreclosure Consumers Are Ready to Rejoin Economy

July 11, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

From Bloomberg News, July 7, 2016

Millions of Americans lost their homes to foreclosures or short sales during the housing crisis. Fortunately for the economy, time heals most wounds — and credit reports.

The number of people joining the rolls of those knocked from homeownership peaked seven years ago, so those blotches to their histories are starting to roll off the books right about now. The resulting improvement in credit scores means more Americans will find themselves with the ability and means to once again apply for loans, and not just for home purchases.

“Improving credit scores might entice households to start borrowing more in general,” said Ralph McLaughlin, chief economist at real estate search engine Trulia. And what better time than now, when interest rates are so low.

That, combined with sustained gains in employment and bigger increases in pay, could give consumer spending, which accounts for almost 70% of the U.S. economy, an added lift over the next couple of years. The impact, though, is hard to quantify because it’s difficult to estimate how many people will once again be emboldened to borrow after experiencing such a shock, said Jacob Oubina, a senior U.S. economist at RBC Capital Markets in New York.

read more…

Chicago Among Cities with Largest Share of Underwater Homeowners

June 14, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

By

Stuck in a home you can’t sell for enough to get out from underneath the mortgage? You are not alone.

More homeowners in the Chicago area are trapped in underwater mortgages than in almost any other major metropolitan area in the country, according to two new studies released this week.

One report, released Thursday by housing research data firm CoreLogic, found Chicago slightly better off than Las Vegas and Miami. But a separate study released Wednesday by real estate website Zillow places Chicago homeowners in the worst position in the nation, with a larger portion of homes underwater than in either Las Vegas or Miami.

When homeowners are underwater, they have unpleasant choices. Their homes are worth less than they owe their lender. So if they decide to sell, they won’t make enough on the sale to repay the lender. Somehow they have to Read more…

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