Pam Marron Home Lending

Chicago Foreclosure Activity: Defaults Approach New Low

July 28, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

By Gary Lucido, July 20, 2017 at 9:05 am         on Chicagonow.com

ATTOM Data Solutions/ RealtyTrac released their Midyear 2017 U.S. Foreclosure Market Report™ today and it continues to show that our foreclosure nightmare is slowly fading into a distant, bad memory. Chicago foreclosure activity came close to breaching the low set 17 months ago and defaults came within a hair’s breadth of puncturing the low of exactly one year ago. That latter point is exceptionally good news since that’s the front end of the pipeline.

It’s all in the graph below. Given the month to month volatility it’s helpful to look back one year ago and realize that total foreclosure activity has fallen by 26% since then. Nevertheless, Chicago remains among the top ten metro areas in foreclosure rates.

Chicago Foreclosure ActivityThe country as a whole is also making steady progress as shown in the graph below, though you can clearly see that foreclosure activity remains above pre-bubble levels. RealtyTrac makes the comparison to the pre-recession period of Q1 2006 to Q3 2007 (a bit later in the game) and notes that foreclosure activity is now 21% below the average of that period. In just the last year it has dropped by 22% and it is at the lowest quarterly level since Q2 2006.

RealtyTrac confirms that Chicago foreclosure activity is also now below the pre-recession period, though it sounds like that is not the case for about half of the larger metro areas.

US Historical Foreclosure Activity

Daren Blomquist, senior vice president with ATTOM Data Solutions, commented on one counter-trend:

Although foreclosures are fading overall, there has been a notable an [sic] uptick in foreclosures completed by some nonbank entities — counter to the sharp downward foreclosure trend among big banks and government-backed loans. These divergent foreclosure trends are likely the result of the big banks and government agencies selling off distressed loans over the past few years to nonbank entities that are now foreclosing on an increasing volume of that deferred distress.

Chicago Shadow Inventory

However, it’s a little disappointing that the number of Chicago homes in some stage of the foreclosure process remains stubbornly above 10,000 although it has been coming down lately as you can see in the graph below. It’s just that we actually went in the wrong direction in June, with an increase of 91 units.

At least we’ve dealt with more than 72% of the problem that we had when I first started to track this data.

Chicago homes in foreclosure

But it looks like government continues to stand in the way of the country making further progress on this problem. The amount of time it takes  to complete a foreclosure hit a new record high of 883 days, which is up from 631 days a year ago. WTF?! That’s going in the wrong direction.

And Illinois is one of the worst states with an average time of 1,059 days (that’s almost 3 years!) compared to Virginia, which is the best state at only 176 days. So when you wonder why there are still so many boarded up buildings in certain parts of the city now you know why.

#Foreclosures #ChicagoForeclosures

Gary Lucido is the President of Lucid Realty, the Chicago area’s full service discount real estate brokerage. If you want to keep up to date on the Chicago real estate market, get an insider’s view of the seamy underbelly of the real estate industry, or you just think he’s the next Kurt Vonnegut you can Subscribe to Getting Real by Email using the form below. Please be sure to verify your email address when you receive the verification notice.

Original article: Chicago Foreclosure Activity: Defaults Approach New Low http://www.chicagonow.com/getting-real/2017/07/chicago-foreclosure-activity-defaults-approach-new-low/

 

 

Americans Who Can’t Afford Their Homes Up 146 Percent

July 7, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

“In the wake of the financial crisis, so much capacity was taken offline,” Swonk told NBC News. “Much of the existing stock of housing is still underwater. Many of the entry level houses are in disrepair.”

Over 38 million American households can’t afford their housing, an increase of 146 percent in the past 16 years, according to a recent Harvard housing report.

Under federal guidelines, households that spend more than 30 percent of their income on housing costs are considered “cost burdened” and will have difficulty affording basic necessities like food, clothing, transportation and medical care.

But the number of Americans struggling with their housing costs has risen from almost 16 million in 2001 to 38 million in 2015, according to the Census data crunched in the report. That’s more than double.

And despite the overall economic recovery, it’s only a small improvement from 2014, going down by about 900,000 households.

When people can’t safely afford to pay their mortgages and rent, it isn’t just a problem for those with a lower income or people who bit off more house than they can chew.

Economic Trickledown

Housing unaffordability also drags down GDP, slowing down overall economic growth for everyone, said Dan McCue, senior research associate at the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University, which publishes the annual State of the Nation’s Housing report.

“It forces them to constrict spending on other items, which would reduce spending on other parts of the economy. They would buy less, save less, reduce savings,” said McCue.

“It may make it more difficult to venture out and start a new company — or, living month to month, they’re much less likely to go back to school and get additional training; and may not be in the job that makes them the most productive member of the labor market,” McCue told NBC News.

A big factor has been how wages haven’t kept pace with rising housing costs.

“For lower income groups, it’s even worse than stagnation. It’s not keeping up with inflation,” said McCue.

A Lack of Affordable Housing

Housing costs are being driven by a limited supply of move-in quality, entry-level housing, said Diane Swonk, CEO of DS Economics.

“In the wake of the financial crisis, so much capacity was taken offline,” Swonk told NBC News. “Much of the existing stock of housing is still underwater. Many of the entry level houses are in disrepair.”

And what building is happening is happening upmarket.

“Builders are less able to downscale and build smaller volumes of smaller homes,” said Swonk. “It’s restricting supply well below demand, so of course it shows up in price.”

Also factoring in is a net decline in migration from Mexico after 2009 that decreased the number of skilled construction workers, and an increase in material costs.

http://www.nbcnews.com/business/real-estate/americans-who-can-t-afford-their-homes-146-percent-n774106

National Real Estate Post is Off the Mark – Here are the Facts!

March 15, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

3/15/17

Dear National Real Estate Post;

With all due respect, you are totally off the mark in today’s video: http://thenationalrealestatepost.com/treasury-giving-away-50k-to-lower-your-mortgage/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&tm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheNationalRealEstatePost+%28The+National+Real+Estate+Post%29

The I-Refi program in Illinois is one of three principal reduction programs throughout the United States. Florida https://www.principalreductionflhhf.org/<https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.principalreductionflhhf.org%2F&h=ATO1fWZjNP8A32GMRnUmkN6naeG4Dz4BmkIbMUe5hdCx36xXo6DxrBc4BJzxt0bxbJpKEzhXkzGW7c6xnQA2pP7Zl2uG-IMYvA7oSGS_1F6HbAeNr1Dfqpl2BcLU7NyNBQs> and California https://www.treasury.gov/…/Changes-to-California%E2%80…<https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.treasury.gov%2Fconnect%2Fblog%2FPages%2FChanges-to-California%25E2%2580%2599s-Principal-Reduction-Program-Attract-More-Mortgage-Servicers.aspx&h=ATMSD1J7t67l3Fj34SmuLQZ-V2HZYFvMjiXFcqgGvNBr6GqdmiiN-UhlqFmbwq4pumGNn7bXbvlGLPZs3ubEZctb_Aj4Rped9Hnn8EGX-Zcsc5vQK80Cn1IGuQmLlOziY6Y> have this program as well. There is income criteria developed not too much different than MSA income used for Home Ready, Home Possible and USDA standards for targeted areas, and an appraisal must provide proof of minimum negative equity.

HOW does I-REFI program help?

The key here is that over 5.4 MILLION homeowners who still have negative equity, are trying to stay put in their home and are current on their mortgage have NO REFINANCE OPTION. If you have a negative equity NON-Fannie Mae or NON-Freddie Mac conventional first mortgage, or a negative equity second mortgage or HELOC, THERE IS NO REFINANCE OPTION AVAILABLE! The only option for better payments for these negative equity loans is a modification from the lender that requires proof of hardship and mortgage delinquency first!

How Many Homeowners are STILL Underwater As of December 2016, there are still 5.4 million homeowners seriously underwater where combined first and second mortgage exceeds 125% per RealtyTrac, (now ATTOM Data Solutions) See chart below and article:http://www.realtytrac.com/…/2016-home-equity-and…/<http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.realtytrac.com%2Fnews%2Fhome-prices-and-sales%2F2016-home-equity-and-underwater-report%2F&h=ATOc2jybWm5plCAanfVNAU490qOjH__LpF5_FqNbyRbudoXeGZM2ovtMsoPvXQ4So4A9sr6cQV9yLlU0tqIGyaT8ksz-Sq1mNYb4Q66x-zRIJdiKSNVM8mMFUnP0e27vuvQ>.

PLEASE stop assuming those with negative equity homes are deadbeats that can’t afford to make their payments. Most of the 5.4 million homeowners who are still underwater struggle while waiting for equity to return, and are paying higher interest rates from 8 to 10 years ago. Many of them have resetting interest only first and second mortgages that cannot be refinanced and these underwater homeowners pay higher payments simply because there is no option for a refinance. And a great number of them are elderly who took out funds from their home to help children years ago.

The Principal Reduction Program (with strict criteria) allows those who have managed to stay current to receive up to a $50,000 reduction that puts them into an acceptable LTV to be able to refinance and stay in their home. The goal here is to keep those in negative equity areas in their homes rather than experience another wave of short sales and foreclosures. These Hardest Hit Funds are not new. The Hardest Hit Funds of 7.6 billion allocated in 2010 were provided to 18 states who suffered the most during the housing crisis. These funds were tailored by each state to meet the needs of struggling homeowners.

As of December 2016, Florida is at the top of the list with 807,607 STILL negative equity properties with a combined loan to value over 125%. California is 2nd and Illinois is 3rd.

Q4 2016 negative equ 125 or more ATTOM Data

Also, here is the link to the Illinois I-REFI program to check out program criteria: https://www.ihda.org/…/uploads/2016/03/7-12-16_I-Refi.pdf<https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ihda.org%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F03%2F7-12-16_I-Refi.pdf&h=ATOhEN8qHEO6vJWuVPUDfDv88soW83Xuy9ADCEQdkLu08FRINTLO-4euGIrh-nBCe1kGHiKsedwW7ulaWBPd3oFHoFQ6VBNVUSw0ctfSfIccocHFR7XUvQMZvr47prm-JzM>

Wages Lag Home Prices; Affordability Suffers

October 3, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

from Mortgage News Daily, Sep 29 2016, 12:57PM

The lack of housing affordability is rising among the 414 U.S. counties tracked by ATTOM Data Solutions.  ATTOM, the new parent company of RealtyTrac, said on Thursday that 24 percent of those counties were less affordable than their historic averages in the third quarter of 2016, up from 22 percent in the second quarter and 19 percent a year earlier.  It was the highest share for this metric since the third quarter of 2009 when 47 percent of markets had fallen below their historic affordability averages.

ATTOM reports that 101 of the 414 counties had an affordability index below 100 in the third quarter of 2016, meaning that buying a median-priced home in that county was less affordable than the historic average for that county going back to the first quarter of 2005.

ATTOM’s affordability index is based on the percentage of average wages (taken from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics) that is needed to make monthly house payments on a median priced home (as determined from publicly recorded sales deeds.) That payment is composed of principle, interest on a 30-year fixed rate mortgage with a 3 percent downpayment and including property taxes, and insurance.

“The improving affordability trend we noted in our second quarter report reversed course in the third quarter as home price appreciation accelerated in the majority of markets and wage growth slowed in the majority of local markets as well as nationwide, where average weekly wages declined in the first quarter of this year following 13 consecutive quarters with year-over-year increases,” said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at ATTOM Data Solutions. “This unhealthy combination resulted in worsening affordability in 63 percent of markets despite mortgage rates that are down 45 basis points from a year ago.

Counties that were less affordable than their historic averages in Q3 included Harris County (Houston), Kings County (Brooklyn); Dallas County; Bexar County (San Antonio); and Alameda County in the San Francisco metro area.

Counties still affordable by historic standards included Los Angeles County, Cook County (Chicago); Maricopa County (Phoenix); Miami-Dade County; and Queens County, New York.

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Chicago Among Cities with Largest Share of Underwater Homeowners

June 14, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

By

Stuck in a home you can’t sell for enough to get out from underneath the mortgage? You are not alone.

More homeowners in the Chicago area are trapped in underwater mortgages than in almost any other major metropolitan area in the country, according to two new studies released this week.

One report, released Thursday by housing research data firm CoreLogic, found Chicago slightly better off than Las Vegas and Miami. But a separate study released Wednesday by real estate website Zillow places Chicago homeowners in the worst position in the nation, with a larger portion of homes underwater than in either Las Vegas or Miami.

When homeowners are underwater, they have unpleasant choices. Their homes are worth less than they owe their lender. So if they decide to sell, they won’t make enough on the sale to repay the lender. Somehow they have to Read more…

Rising Prices Should Take 1M More Owners Out of Negative Equity

June 10, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

by Jacob Passy (National Mortgage News)

There were more than a million homeowners whose properties exited negative equity status over the past year, with the potential for another million to do so if home prices continue to rise, according to CoreLogic.

CoreLogic reported Thursday that the number of underwater properties at the end of the first quarter totaled 4 million, which equates to 8% of all homes with a mortgage. That figure was down 6.2% from the fourth quarter and 21.5% from a year ago.

read more…

Negative Equity Falls Nationally, Finds Foothold in Midwest

June 10, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

by Jacob Passy (National Mortgage News)

While negative equity rates continue to drop nationally from their 2012 peak, the share of homeowners underwater in the Rust Belt remains elevated, according to data from Zillow.

The negative equity rate, which measures the share of all homeowners with a mortgage who owe more than their home is worth, was 12.7% during the first quarter, down from 13.1% in the fourth quarter and 15.4% in the first quarter of 2015. The negative equity rate hit its peak in the first quarter of 2012 at 31.4% and has either fallen or held steady every quarter since then, Zillow said Wednesday.

read more…

Negative Equity still Plagues Lowest Tier Homes

April 13, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

While the percentage of properties with negative equity decreased during 2015, the lowest-priced homes continued to struggle to regain value, according to Black Knight Financial Services.

The number of underwater borrowers dropped by 31%, or 1.5 million homeowners, but there are still a total of 3.2 million borrowers in negative equity positions, representing $126 billion in underwater first- and second-lien housing debt, Black Knight said in its year-to-year Mortgage Monitor Report for February.

read more…

Better Details Needed for FHA Back to Work, Conv “Extenuating Circumstances”

May 6, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Better Details Needed for FHA Back to Work Program and Conventional “Extenuating Circumstances”

 

By Pam Marron

For past short sellers who have gone through the loss of a home and are eligible to return, criteria needed for a new mortgage is vague. The result is a partial story.

Proving “extenuating circumstances” and confining the timeline for an economic event is a struggle for loan originators and underwriters trying to comply with vague criteria. Because of so many variables, lenders deny new loans for borrowers with a short sale or foreclosure in their past even when they may be eligible to repurchase again.

We HAVE to get this right. Detailing WHY the loss of a home is the hardest thing for affected consumers to provide… not because they can’t remember, but because they relive it.

In attempting to originate the FHA “Back to Work” loans, it would seem the process is simple. The criteria for “Back to Work” is to show a 20% reduction in income sustained for 6 months minimum that resulted from a loss of employment or reduction in income, which is considered the “economic event”.

Here’s the bigger problem. Most who had an “economic event” tried to hang on, wiping out assets along the way. But, while trying to hang on, homeowners accumulated more debt to stay solvent and in most cases, to stay current on their mortgage. Then, another “economic event” hit, assets were gone and debt is so excessive that there is no choice but to short sell.

As a mortgage broker in Florida where it is common to see Boomerang Buyers (those eligible to re-enter the housing market after a short sale or foreclosure), I often hear the full story for those who have lost a home and want to re-try home ownership again. An economic event followed by a prolonged period of trying to stay put, finally ended with another event where funds were no longer available and the only choice was to short sale, occurred in a great deal of these cases.

Proof also exists to show a good number of these folks had excessive debt that pushed up debt to income ratios incredibly high prior to the sale of their underwater home.

But, it gets confusing for a new mortgage. For the FHA “Back to Work” program, HUD approved counselors are able to determine hardship and can provide those who attempt a re-purchase one year after a short sale, foreclosure or bankruptcy with a housing counseling certificate.

However, that doesn’t mean the mortgage company will approve the mortgage. Because the economic event may have occurred years ago and short sale processes took months or years, documentation such as tax returns and bank statements needed to show a lack of assets may stretch over the previous five to seven years rather than the most recent two years that lenders are accustomed to evaluating.

Mortgage companies who offer FHA “Back to Work” are reluctant to promote this almost two year old program due to few of these loans getting approved. Part of this is because loan originators don’t provide enough documentation, and the other problem is that there seems to be wide discrepancy between underwriting opinion on these files.

Varying opinion also exists for “extenuating circumstances” noted in Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac guidelines for eligibility of a new mortgage under four years. Underwriting interpretation of these guidelines vary greatly from lender to lender for the few mortgage companies who offer these loans.

For loans submitted with what seems to be an iron clad “extenuating circumstance” or proof of the 20% reduction in income for 6 months minimum for FHA’s “Back to Work” program, underwriter opinion seems to vary widely. Some underwriters think the decision to short sale was too soon, while others wonder why homeowners waited. It seems they are trying to justify the sale was “not strategic”.

The income, current credit and assets of borrowers who have gone through a short sale and are trying to re-enter the housing market is more than acceptable per current guidelines. They have to be next to perfect, and they know it. Other than knowledge of the past short sale, these are loans that any lender would want to have on their books.

Those who make policy need to talk directly with affected past short sellers. They need to come to where underwater home problems still exist and see for themselves what is really happening. This can truly help the housing industry recover.

 

 

 

 

National Consumer Reporting Assoc.(NCRA)…Could Not Have Done This Without Them!

September 6, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

NCRA 8.23.13

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