Pam Marron Home Lending

ForeclosureCreditFix.com now open to check if foreclosure code on past short sale or modification

September 18, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

ForeclosureCreditFix.com now open to check if foreclosure code on past short sale or modification

By Pamela Marron | September 2017 | for National Mortgage Professional Magazine

Though the consumer pays for this service upfront, loan originators can provide a credit towards the cost at the closing of a new mortgage. Loan originators who agree to provide this credit will be promoted on the Foreclosure Credit Fix Network map at http://foreclosurecreditfix.com/network along with lenders, realtors and credit reporting agencies who want to assist these clients.

 What do nearly 3 million past short-sellers and over 5 million homeowners who have had a modification have in common? All of them may be affected by a foreclosure code that continues to be applied to mortgage credit of a past short sale or modification and results in a new conventional mortgage denial.

 HUD approved counseling agencies have launched an effort to check for a foreclosure code on mortgage credit of past short sellers and those who have had a modification and get it corrected before the consumer attempts to get a new mortgage. Though this service is for the affected consumer, it is also the resource for loan originators, lenders, realtors and credit reporting agencies to send clients to for help. Thanks to the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (NFCC.org) and member HUD approved counseling agency Navicore Solutions, affected consumers can get this problem checked out and resolved before they purchase a home again. Clients can call 1-866-702-4557 or email housing@navicoresolutions.org. When the problem is corrected and these clients are “mortgage ready”, they can be referred to loan originators, lenders and realtors.

The foreclosure code issue affects past short sellers and those with a modification who apply for a new conventional mortgage. There are three reasons why this problem is not being caught and dealt with by lenders ahead of a purchase:

  1. affected consumers have met the four-year wait timeframe required after a short sale or the two-year wait timeframe required after a modification.
  2. The foreclosure code is not visible on a tri-merged credit report.
  3. because of the 2 previous reasons, there is no urgency of lenders to run these loans through the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac automated underwriting systems upfront.

The problem is often found during a live contract when the loan is run through both the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac automated underwriting systems. When it is found, the consumer has four options:

  1. Re-run the loan through the Fannie Mae Desktop underwriting system using Fannie Mae’s workaround. (Freddie Mac does not have a workaround.)
  2. Change the loan to an FHA mortgage which allows for a manual underwrite.
  3. Change the loan to a portfolio conventional mortgage which is usually a higher interest rate with greater costs and more down payment required.
  4. lose the contract.

The solution can be a two-step process. The first step determines if the foreclosure code exists and could include utilizing the Fannie Mae workaround. The second step is to make sure that a more recent “date reported” of the affected account does not exist. If the automated system reads that the short sale or modification occurred within the minimum wait timeframe, this can be a reason for a denial. The “date reported” problem often occurs when a “dispute” is put on the affected account. Because the account is re-opened, the more recent “date reported” is recorded and cannot be changed.

Other pre-purchase housing and credit counseling is also available from HUD approved counselors about buying a home, renting, default, foreclosure avoidance, credit issues and reverse mortgages. Some services are free and others are on a sliding scale basis. To find counselors in your area, go to HUD Approved Housing Counseling Agencies at https://www.hud.gov/offices/hsg/sfh/hcc/hcs.cfm, click on your state and check under Counseling Services and for agencies in your area.

For more in-depth credit counseling and debt management (NOT to be confused with credit repair), go to the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (NFCC.org) agency locator at https://www.nfcc.org/locator/. All member agencies have HUD approved housing counselors with additional specialized training to deal with credit issues.

As we turn the corner on the housing crisis, lingering problems still need our attention. Thinking of those who were affected by Hurricane Harvey, the mortgage and real estate industries have an opportunity to form new, strong alliances with housing counseling agencies for specialized services that we are not equipped or trained to deal with.

Stay tuned.

 

 

 

Study Finds Gen X Homeowners Lacking in Equity

July 24, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Written by Phil Hall, as seen on National Mortgage Professional News, July 18, 2017

While many people are ready to tuck the housing crash into the history books, its residue is still being felt by Gen X homeowners with minimal equity gains, according the latest Zillow Home Equity Report. Indeed, the Gen X demographic has almost as much equity as Millennials homeowners, even though the latter had far less time to gain equity.
Zillow found that the typical Millennial homeowner—someone less than 35 years old—owed their lender about 76 percent of their home’s current value, while the median Gen X homeowner—someone between 35 to 50 years old—owed 70 percent of their home’s value. In comparison, Baby Boomers owed about 56 percent of their home’s value, while seniors with a mortgage owed 45 percent.
“Roughly half of American wealth is held in home equity,” said Zillow Chief Economist Svenja Gudell. “Paying off the home mortgage is a key step toward retirement for most Americans, and it’s clear from these results that Generation X is further from that goal than older generations because of the Great Recession. The good news is that home values are still growing relatively fast in most places, building up home equity for homeowners who rely on the investment they’ve made in their home.”
Zillow also found the median homeowner with a mortgage has $78,683 in home equity, while homeowners who own their homes outright typically have $177,158 in home equity. The median homeowner has a loan-to-value ratio of 62.2, or owes 62.2 percent of their home’s current value, while 75.7 percent of homeowners have at least 20 percent equity in their homes. Five percent of mortgaged homeowners are close to owning their homes free and clear, but 10.4 percent of mortgaged homeowners have negative equity.

Americans Who Can’t Afford Their Homes Up 146 Percent

July 7, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

“In the wake of the financial crisis, so much capacity was taken offline,” Swonk told NBC News. “Much of the existing stock of housing is still underwater. Many of the entry level houses are in disrepair.”

Over 38 million American households can’t afford their housing, an increase of 146 percent in the past 16 years, according to a recent Harvard housing report.

Under federal guidelines, households that spend more than 30 percent of their income on housing costs are considered “cost burdened” and will have difficulty affording basic necessities like food, clothing, transportation and medical care.

But the number of Americans struggling with their housing costs has risen from almost 16 million in 2001 to 38 million in 2015, according to the Census data crunched in the report. That’s more than double.

And despite the overall economic recovery, it’s only a small improvement from 2014, going down by about 900,000 households.

When people can’t safely afford to pay their mortgages and rent, it isn’t just a problem for those with a lower income or people who bit off more house than they can chew.

Economic Trickledown

Housing unaffordability also drags down GDP, slowing down overall economic growth for everyone, said Dan McCue, senior research associate at the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University, which publishes the annual State of the Nation’s Housing report.

“It forces them to constrict spending on other items, which would reduce spending on other parts of the economy. They would buy less, save less, reduce savings,” said McCue.

“It may make it more difficult to venture out and start a new company — or, living month to month, they’re much less likely to go back to school and get additional training; and may not be in the job that makes them the most productive member of the labor market,” McCue told NBC News.

A big factor has been how wages haven’t kept pace with rising housing costs.

“For lower income groups, it’s even worse than stagnation. It’s not keeping up with inflation,” said McCue.

A Lack of Affordable Housing

Housing costs are being driven by a limited supply of move-in quality, entry-level housing, said Diane Swonk, CEO of DS Economics.

“In the wake of the financial crisis, so much capacity was taken offline,” Swonk told NBC News. “Much of the existing stock of housing is still underwater. Many of the entry level houses are in disrepair.”

And what building is happening is happening upmarket.

“Builders are less able to downscale and build smaller volumes of smaller homes,” said Swonk. “It’s restricting supply well below demand, so of course it shows up in price.”

Also factoring in is a net decline in migration from Mexico after 2009 that decreased the number of skilled construction workers, and an increase in material costs.

http://www.nbcnews.com/business/real-estate/americans-who-can-t-afford-their-homes-146-percent-n774106

Dodd-Frank: Trump says roll-back, consumers map fight back

June 14, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Kevin McCoy and Roger Yu , USA TODAY Published 7:02 a.m. ET June 14, 2017 |

Newly announced Trump administration plans to weaken or eliminate many financial-industry regulations enacted after the 2008 financial crisis mark the opening shot in what consumer groups predict will be a long Washington siege.

On Tuesday, the day after the Department of the Treasury issued the most detailed blueprint yet of proposed changes to the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, banking and other financial groups celebrated Trump’s backing of changes they’ve sought for years. The list ranged from restructuring and weakening the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to reexamining Wall Street trading and mortgage rules.

“The Treasury Department’s report is an important first step in recognizing how a duplicative and onerous regulatory environment harms banks, the economy, and, more importantly, consumers,” said Richard Hunt, the CEO of the Consumer Bankers Association, a trade association for retail banks.

Consumer advocates argue that the proposals represent an unwarranted weakening of rules that reined in banks and Wall Street after their excesses contributed to the nation’s worst economic crisis in generations. But major changes won’t come soon, if at all, because eliminating federal laws or Washington agency rules can take years, the advocates say.

“The prospects for preventing the rollback of many of these rules are actually quite good in terms of delay, and probably not bad in terms of preventing,” said Dennis Kelleher, the president and CEO of Better Markets, a Washington, D.C.-based nonprofit group that promotes the U.S. public’s interests in financial markets. “Enacting the administration’s regulatory agenda can be as difficult as enacting its legislative agenda if there is effective opposition.”

File photo taken in 2015 shows Richard Cordray, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, at a hearing in Denver, Colorado.(Photo: Brennan Linsley, AP)

Lobbying will likely spread across multiple fronts. But perhaps nowhere are the disagreements hotter than over the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Echoing complaints from Congressional Republicans, the Treasury report said the CFPB’s leadership — a lone director only loosely accountable to the president and wielding authority to enforce 18 federal financial laws — has made the agency “unaccountable to the American people.”

In response, the Treasury report recommended:

Authorizing the president to remove the CFPB’s director at will, rather than only when he or she is found to have done something improper.

Considering an alternative leadership structure of an “independent, multi-member commission or board.”

Changing the agency’s funding procedure to require oversight by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, as well as congressional review.

Switching enforcement actions to federal courts, rather than administrative proceedings handled internally at the agency.

Eliminating public access to underlying data in the agency’s consumer complaint database by restricting that material to federal and state agencies.

Stripping the agency’s supervisory authority over banking and other areas covered by other regulators.

Paul Merski, a Community Bankers of America vice president, applauded yet another proposal, one that would exempt banks with assets of $10 billion or less from complying with CFPB rules that remove some risk features from mortgage loans. That list includes an “interest-only” repayment period, balloon payments required at the end of some mortgages, loan terms longer than 30 years, and excessive upfront fees charged to consumers.

“The main reason for community bank relief is so that they can support growth and jobs,” Merski said.

The CFPB maintained an official silence on the Treasury proposals. Instead, the regulator announced that its director, Richard Cordray, would hold a Thursday public event in Raleigh, N.C. to discuss student loan servicing issues, an area of continuing concern for students who say some loan servicers have not helped the get into income-based repayment plans.

However, Alys Cohen, a staff attorney for the National Consumer Law Center, said the proposals would “kick the legs out from under the CFPB,” which reported it had provided nearly $12 billion in relief and assistance to more than 29 million consumers from its 2011 opening through the end of February 2017.

A random sampling of consumers referred by advocacy groups readily agreed.

In Minnesota, John Lukach said he filed a complaint with the CFPB after Navient, the servicer for his nearly $60,000 in private student loans, did not respond to his requests for more affordable repayment options that would cut his monthly bill. Within two days, a Navient representative contacted him to discuss available alternatives, “something that probably wouldn’t have happened” without the CFPB, Lukach said.

In Arkansas, Myra Brewer, 71, said a debt collector called her and tried to force her to repay a roughly $3,000 credit card debt the company said was owed by her late daughter. She refused, even as the company called multiple times a day for weeks, Brewer said. Ultimately, she obtained the name of the bank that had put the purported loan out for collection and then filed a complaint with the CFPB. “That got action,” she said.

In Florida, a mortgage loan originator Pamela Marron noticed that many former homeowners who’d been caught in a wave of financial crisis short sales — selling their houses for less than the mortgage total — had trouble reentering the housing market. The reason, she determined, was that the nation’s three major credit reporting agencies coded the short sales as foreclosures. That meant the consumers could not qualify for conventional, federal government-backed mortgages for seven years.

After Marron filed complaints with the CFPB, banks re-coded the consumers’ mortgage applications and started processing them. “The CFPB people were very helpful because they understood the data we were looking at,” she said.

Armed with similar consumer experiences, advocacy groups are already discussing efforts to block Washington’s efforts to weaken the CFPB.

Kelleher, the Better Markets CEO, likened the efforts to the recent consumer drive that stopped the administration from derailing an Obama-era rule that now requires financial advisers to put consumers’ interests above their own. The regulation went into partial effect last week, but enforcement isn’t set to start until January.

“Big parts of that coalition will also work against deregulation” elsewhere in the financial industry, Kelleher said.

Follow USA TODAY reporter Kevin McCoy on Twitter: @kmccoynyc

______________________________________________________________________________________________

In USA Today. Help that CFPB provided for short sale code problem noted. CFPB “Submit a Complaint” worked when other fixes did not. Directions: http://housingcrisisstories.com/submit-a-complaint-cfpb/

https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/2017/06/14/dodd-frank-trump-says-roll-back-consumers-map-fight-back/102814996/

© 2017 USA TODAY, a division of Gannett Satellite Information Network, LLC.

Dodd-Frank: Trump says roll-back, consumers map fight back

Call to weaken post-crisis financial safeguards could face long battle

National Real Estate Post is Off the Mark – Here are the Facts!

March 15, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

3/15/17

Dear National Real Estate Post;

With all due respect, you are totally off the mark in today’s video: http://thenationalrealestatepost.com/treasury-giving-away-50k-to-lower-your-mortgage/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&tm_campaign=Feed%3A+TheNationalRealEstatePost+%28The+National+Real+Estate+Post%29

The I-Refi program in Illinois is one of three principal reduction programs throughout the United States. Florida https://www.principalreductionflhhf.org/<https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.principalreductionflhhf.org%2F&h=ATO1fWZjNP8A32GMRnUmkN6naeG4Dz4BmkIbMUe5hdCx36xXo6DxrBc4BJzxt0bxbJpKEzhXkzGW7c6xnQA2pP7Zl2uG-IMYvA7oSGS_1F6HbAeNr1Dfqpl2BcLU7NyNBQs> and California https://www.treasury.gov/…/Changes-to-California%E2%80…<https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.treasury.gov%2Fconnect%2Fblog%2FPages%2FChanges-to-California%25E2%2580%2599s-Principal-Reduction-Program-Attract-More-Mortgage-Servicers.aspx&h=ATMSD1J7t67l3Fj34SmuLQZ-V2HZYFvMjiXFcqgGvNBr6GqdmiiN-UhlqFmbwq4pumGNn7bXbvlGLPZs3ubEZctb_Aj4Rped9Hnn8EGX-Zcsc5vQK80Cn1IGuQmLlOziY6Y> have this program as well. There is income criteria developed not too much different than MSA income used for Home Ready, Home Possible and USDA standards for targeted areas, and an appraisal must provide proof of minimum negative equity.

HOW does I-REFI program help?

The key here is that over 5.4 MILLION homeowners who still have negative equity, are trying to stay put in their home and are current on their mortgage have NO REFINANCE OPTION. If you have a negative equity NON-Fannie Mae or NON-Freddie Mac conventional first mortgage, or a negative equity second mortgage or HELOC, THERE IS NO REFINANCE OPTION AVAILABLE! The only option for better payments for these negative equity loans is a modification from the lender that requires proof of hardship and mortgage delinquency first!

How Many Homeowners are STILL Underwater As of December 2016, there are still 5.4 million homeowners seriously underwater where combined first and second mortgage exceeds 125% per RealtyTrac, (now ATTOM Data Solutions) See chart below and article:http://www.realtytrac.com/…/2016-home-equity-and…/<http://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.realtytrac.com%2Fnews%2Fhome-prices-and-sales%2F2016-home-equity-and-underwater-report%2F&h=ATOc2jybWm5plCAanfVNAU490qOjH__LpF5_FqNbyRbudoXeGZM2ovtMsoPvXQ4So4A9sr6cQV9yLlU0tqIGyaT8ksz-Sq1mNYb4Q66x-zRIJdiKSNVM8mMFUnP0e27vuvQ>.

PLEASE stop assuming those with negative equity homes are deadbeats that can’t afford to make their payments. Most of the 5.4 million homeowners who are still underwater struggle while waiting for equity to return, and are paying higher interest rates from 8 to 10 years ago. Many of them have resetting interest only first and second mortgages that cannot be refinanced and these underwater homeowners pay higher payments simply because there is no option for a refinance. And a great number of them are elderly who took out funds from their home to help children years ago.

The Principal Reduction Program (with strict criteria) allows those who have managed to stay current to receive up to a $50,000 reduction that puts them into an acceptable LTV to be able to refinance and stay in their home. The goal here is to keep those in negative equity areas in their homes rather than experience another wave of short sales and foreclosures. These Hardest Hit Funds are not new. The Hardest Hit Funds of 7.6 billion allocated in 2010 were provided to 18 states who suffered the most during the housing crisis. These funds were tailored by each state to meet the needs of struggling homeowners.

As of December 2016, Florida is at the top of the list with 807,607 STILL negative equity properties with a combined loan to value over 125%. California is 2nd and Illinois is 3rd.

Q4 2016 negative equ 125 or more ATTOM Data

Also, here is the link to the Illinois I-REFI program to check out program criteria: https://www.ihda.org/…/uploads/2016/03/7-12-16_I-Refi.pdf<https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ihda.org%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F03%2F7-12-16_I-Refi.pdf&h=ATOhEN8qHEO6vJWuVPUDfDv88soW83Xuy9ADCEQdkLu08FRINTLO-4euGIrh-nBCe1kGHiKsedwW7ulaWBPd3oFHoFQ6VBNVUSw0ctfSfIccocHFR7XUvQMZvr47prm-JzM>

When Unpopular Policy Works

December 6, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Our current administration inherited a financial crisis that this country has not experienced anything close to since the Great Depression. When the collapse occurred, it was visible by the number of unoccupied homes, and many of us knew of friends, relatives and colleagues who were affected. Initially, problems were blamed on the unscrupulous mortgage broker industry until it was learned that the banking industry had an equal amount of blame.

Almost every loan originator I know was negatively impacted by the housing crisis. They were either losing their homes or their income and in many cases, both. All of us saw the housing bubble, but complacency set in after it continued for years, not months. When the crash happened, it was fast and mammoth. It had to be dealt with and the depth of problems that housing faced during the last eight years was unprecedented. Drastic measures were necessary to be put in place immediately to stop the bleeding.

Many say that measures put in place went too far and stalled the progress of the housing market and ultimately added more cost to the entire mortgage process. Others say it could have been much worse if these safeguards were not in place, and that the inconveniences placed upon our industry need to be adapted to. But a few changes occurred that have provided end results that could be argued as good.

The Role of AMC’s and Home Prices

Many of us have concerns when we see housing prices increase quicker than normal trends again. How do we safeguard against alarmingly fast increases in home value that was the norm prior to the crash? The answer appears to be the Appraisal Management Companies, or AMC’s where all (or at least) Qualified Mortgage (QM) appraisals must go through. Appraisals are now done by third-party appraisal management companies (AMC) who lenders and realtors have no communication with until after the appraisal is completed. Even though the process can be frustrating, the value can’t be blamed on the buyers’ lender. A dispute in value can be done but it is with the appraiser through the AMC rather than the lender.

Qualified Mortgages (QM)

Due to requirements put in place by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), almost all secondary market sellable mortgage products no longer have prepayment penalties, negative amortization, balloons and interest only options. Prior to the housing crash, these negative options were mostly explained to consumers as “rare to happen”, but ultimately became a main reason so many homeowners were negatively affected by the housing crash.

Consequently, a new industry of non-QM mortgage products is out there. Though a rare few have limited “skin in the game”, most of these products require 20% equity to do the deal.

I know that many in my industry have opposite views of the above. And, yes, policies can be streamlined. Frustrating to all of us is that dealing with housing issues seem to come to a standstill 6 to 12 months before every election cycle, seeming to be a topic that no political candidate wants to touch.

Please don’t say the past housing crash won’t happen again with policy changes in the new administration. Instead, those of us in the mortgage and real estate industries need to ensure that this doesn’t happen again by looking at what policies have and have not worked. More effort needs to be placed in finetuning policy that does work.

Erroneous Foreclosure Code still results in Loan Denial for Past Short Sellers in Freddie Mac Loan Prospector(LP) for Conventional Loans

October 26, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Loan originator is asking your assistance to share LP conventional mortgage “Caution” files of past short sellers that have passed the 4-year mark.

By Pam Marron   July 28, 2016
In August of 2014, Fannie Mae successfully implemented an automated system workaround that enabled lenders to correct conventional loan Refer/Ineligible findings when past short sale credit shows up as a foreclosure in the Desktop Underwriter or Originator. Freddie Mac’s Loan Prospector automated underwriting system never implemented a correction, and past short sale credit still results in a Loan Prospector “Caution”, or loan denial, for those trying to obtain a new conventional mortgage after a shortsale. The problem does not occur for government FHA and VA loans. Freddie Mac’s Caution findings commonly lists in the reasons for denial under Credit Risk Comments: “13. Recent foreclosure/signif derog appears on credit report”.
A Freddie Mac “Caution” denial requires a manual underwrite to overcome this error.  Lenders that will do a manual underwrite on either Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae conventional loan files are rare to find. The good news is that the credit repository(s) reporting the foreclosure is now able to be found and seen in raw data through credit reporting agencies.
This would not be of such great concern if the mortgage industry was not approaching the rollout of the new “Trended Credit Data” that will work with the Fannie Desktop automated system in Version 10.0 set to be implemented on September 24, 2016.
If there are any glitches in the DU 10.0 format, lenders will likely put their loans through the Freddie Mac Loan Prospector automated underwriting system. Because a work around was never implemented for Freddie Mac, past short sellers eligible for a new mortgage will receive an automated “Caution”, or a denial for a new mortgage.
When the problem of the “Caution” in Freddie Mac’s automated system is brought up, the response from Freddie Mac has been that their system has been corrected and problems are with individual files. This article was written to alert Freddie Mac that as more past short sellers become eligible to purchase a home again, we as lenders are experiencing the problem of the “Caution” denial of new conventional mortgages on all files that are conventional, and more often.
This is what we are finding. All files currently being entered into Loan Prospector for a conventional mortgage purchase where a past short sale exists in credit are receiving a “Caution”, even when the past short sale is past the four-year mark, the wait time required after a short sale for a new Freddie Mac conventional mortgage.
A few lenders have stated they have received an “Accept” for a past short seller on a conventional mortgage, but we have found that only loans submitted for an FHA or VA loan appear to receive an “Accept”. This is believed to be due to the fact that Total Scorecard, an additional credit mechanism found in both Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, allows the loan to receive an Approve or Accept respectively through both systems but verification of the short sale account must be backed up with documentation proving a short sale rather than a foreclosure. Additionally, it was checked to see if the problem was due to specific credit reporting agencies. Thus far, multiple credit agency reports for the same borrower have resulted in the same denial.
Unfortunately, Freddie Mac Loan Prospector does not designate which account it is classified as a foreclosure. However, the repository(s) that reports the short sale as a foreclosure can be visually found in raw data of the three repositories, Experian, Trans Union and Equifax in the credit report. Lenders who want to specifically see this to distinguish the problem need to make sure they contact their credit reporting agency and ask for the MOP (method of payment) and a horizontal payment history grid to be available on their report. A screen shot of raw data may ultimately be needed if where the foreclosure code exists is not evident on the visual credit report.
Because of the concern that mortgage traffic will increase in Freddie Mac Loan Prospector if a problem arises in Version 10.0 of the Fannie Mae Desktop Underwriter with the introduction of Trended Data Credit, we are proactively and respectfully bringing this known problem of short sale credit that shows up as a foreclosure on conventional loans only again to Freddie Mac’s attention. If you are a loan originator or lender that encounters a “Caution” denial in the Freddie Mac Loan Prospector automated underwriting system for past short sellers trying to obtain a conventional mortgage, please contact Pam Marron at 727-375-8986 or email pam.m.marron@gmail.com.
To best prepare, make sure that you run past short seller files through both Fannie Mae Desktop Underwriter/Originator and Freddie Mac’s Loan Prospector automated underwriting systems upfront. Don’t wait until the final submission to underwriting.
Stay tuned!

Feds Plan to Sue Moody’s Over Pre-2008 Securities Ratings

October 24, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

, as published on National Mortgage Professional.com

Friday, October 21, 2016 – 15:07

Moody’s Corp. has announced that the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) is planning to bring a civil complaint that charges the company with violating the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act for its rating of residential mortgage-backed securities and collateralized debt obligations in the period before the 2008 financial crash.

According to a Bloomberg report, Moody’s revealed that it was informed of the DOJ’s plans in a September 29 letter from the department. Moody’s added that an unspecified number of state attorneys general may pursue similar claims, adding that the governmental probes into the case “remains ongoing and may expand to include additional theories.”
The DOJ offered no public comment on the report. Last year, another credit ratings agency, S&P, paid $1.5 billion to settle federal charges accusing it of improper ratings prior to the 2008 crash. S&P added that it accepted the settlement rather than deal with the “delay, uncertainty, inconvenience, and expense” of litigation.

Yellen Raises the Possibility of a “High-Pressure” Economy

October 19, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

from National Mortgage Professional Magazine, Friday, October 14, 2016

Federal Reserve Chairwoman Janet Yellen took a dramatic departure from her usual talking points to wonder aloud if a “high-pressure” economy would be able to erase the lingering economic wreckage created by the 2008 crash.

According to a Reuters report, Yellen used a speech today before an economics conference to outline potential solutions to the continued problems that have prevented a complete recovery from the last recession. Yellen stated whether a fix could be achieved “by temporarily running a ‘high-pressure economy,’ with robust aggregate demand and a tight labor market. One can certainly identify plausible ways in which this might occur. Increased business sales would almost certainly raise the productive capacity of the economy by encouraging additional capital spending, especially if accompanied by reduced uncertainty about future prospects. In addition, a tight labor market might draw in potential workers who would otherwise sit on the sidelines and encourage job-to-job transitions that could also lead to more efficient—and, hence, more productive—job matches. Finally, albeit more speculatively, strong demand could potentially yield significant productivity.”

Yellen did not speculate on what this scenario would mean for the housing market, which has seen home prices rising far ahead of wages. Nor did she address what has become the new guessing game in economic political circles: when will the Fed start to raise interest rates with greater regularity? Instead, her comments pointed to a new toolbox that central bankers would be able to use in the event that the 2008 situation were to happen again.

“If strong economic conditions can partially reverse supply-side damage after it has occurred, then policymakers may want to aim at being more accommodative during recoveries than would be called for under the traditional view that supply is largely independent of demand,” Yellen said, adding that it would “make it even more important for policymakers to act quickly and aggressively in response to a recession, because doing so would help to reduce the depth and persistence of the downturn.”

Even if Refinancing Looks Like a No-Brainer…

October 3, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

from MortgageNewsDaily.com, Sep 28 2016, 12:27PM

Why are so many people holding on to mortgages with high interest rates?  Sentiment? Inertia?

Apparently not.  In the current issue of CoreLogic’s MarketPulse, Principal Economist Molly Boesel drills down into the universe of borrowers who are standing fast with their old loans, even though it looks on paper like a refinance would be a smart move.  She finds that many of these borrowers haven’t refinanced either because they can’t or it really isn’t worth it.

Looking at the mortgages that were outstanding at the end of May, Boesel found that 41 percent of them representing 31 percent of unpaid principal balance (UPB) had mortgage rates greater than 4.38 percent, roughly 100 basis points higher than the current rates at that juncture and a point at which refinancing makes financial sense.  Eighteen percent of all mortgages (representing 17 percent of UPB) have rates between 4.38 and 5.0 percent, and 23 percent have rates over 5 percent.  Why wouldn’t these borrowers refinance?

First she found that a lot of them are currently seriously delinquent on their existing loans. While only about 2 percent of low interest rate mortgages (under 5 percent) are seriously delinquent, 12 percent of those with rates above 7 percent are 90 or more days past due and would be unlikely to qualify for a new mortgage.

Even current mortgages with high rates present a difficult credit profile.  Between 30 and 50 percent of loans with rates over 5 percent have at some point had a 30-day delinquency.  The incidence rises with the rate.  Only about 11 percent of those with rates below 5 percent have at some point been 30 days overdue.  Those “ever late” borrowers may not be able to qualify for a low enough rate to make refinancing attractive.

Boesel also removed mortgages in private-label securities from the list of refinanceable borrowers because they would not be eligible for HARP loans that are reserved for refinancing Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac loans.

After taking the currently delinquent, ever delinquent, and private label loans out of the mix she found that the share of loans with interest rates greater than 5 percent had fallen to 13 percent of those outstanding and to 7 percent of UPB.  And that latter number is the final piece of the puzzle.

Small outstanding balances may not be worth refinancing as the resulting savings would be low. The figure above shows the average UPB of outstanding mortgages that have never been delinquent and are not in private pools by their interest rate.  Those borrowers with rates above 5% have very low UPB; those above 7 percent have average balances of $53,000.

While mortgages rates are near historic loans, Boesel concludes, there may not be many borrowers left who have the incentive or are eligible to refinance.


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